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La Antigua Reserva Zoom

La Antigua Reserva

2010 | Spain | Rioja 750 ml | 13.50 %
  • Tastes like
  • Berry
  • Strawberry
  • Good with
  • Beef
  • Lamb
  • Its also
  • 90+
¥320
  • Buy 3 ¥288 and save 10%
  • Buy 6 ¥256 and save 20%
  • Product details

    Description

    From a vineyard planted in 1940 on the southern tip of Rioja Alta, where 700mm of rain falls per annum. Unusually for Rioja, Garnacha dominates – it’s 60% of the blend, with 30% Tempranillo and 10% Graciano. Spending 3 years in oak, it’s got an ashy, earthy nose with aromas of figs, prunes, and tobacco, balanced by fresh strawberry and raspberry notes and high acidity. Plenty of pepper, licorice, and vanilla spice on the soft but structured palate.
    Rated 91/100 by Antonio Galloni and 91/100 by James Suckling.

    Variety Description

    Tempranillo

    Tempranillo is a black grape variety widely grown to make full-bodied red wines in its native Spain. It is the main grape used in Rioja, and is often referred to as Spain's noble grape. Unlike more aromatic red wine varieties like Cabernet Sauvignon and Pinot noir, Tempranillo has a relatively neutral profile so it is often blended with other varieties, such as Grenache and Carignan (known in Rioja as Mazuelo), or aged for extended periods in oak where the wine easily takes on the flavor of the barrel.

    Grenache

    Grenache or Garnacha is one of the most widely planted red wine grape varieties in the world. It ripens late, so it needs hot, dry conditions such as those found in Spain, where the grape probably originated, Sardinia, the south of France, and California. It is generally spicy, berry-flavored and soft on the palate with a relatively high alcohol conten. Wines made from Grenache tend to lack acid, tannin and color, and is usually blended with other varieties such as Syrah, Carignan, Tempranillo and Cinsaut.

    Country Description

    Spain

    Spain is the most widely wine producing country in the world, but the dry, infertile soil found in many Spanish wine regions makes low yields making Spain only the third largest wine producing country. The country has an abundance of native grape varieties, with over 400 varieties planted throughout Spain though 80 percent of the country's wine production is from only 20 grapes. Major Spanish wine regions include the Rioja and Ribera del Duero which is known for their Tempranillo production; Valdepeñas, known for high quality tempranillo at low prices; Jerez, the home of the fortified wine Sherry; Rías Baixas in the northwest region of Galicia that is known for its white wines made from Albariño and Catalonia which includes the Cava and still wine producing regions of the Penedès as well the Priorat region.

    Region Description

    Rioja

    Rioja is a wine region, with Denominación de Origen Calificada (D.O.Ca. Qualified designation of origin) named after La Rioja, in Spain, located in the north of the country. Rioja is further subdivided into three zones: Rioja Alta, Rioja Baja and Rioja Alavesa. Many wines have traditionally blended fruit from all three regions though there is a slow growth in single-zone wines. Rioja wines are normally a blend of various grape varieties, and can be either red (tinto), white (blanco) or rosé (rosado). Among the Tintos, the best-known and most widely used variety is Tempranillo. Other grapes used include Garnacha Tinta, Graciano, and Mazuelo. A typical blend will consist of approximately 60% Tempranillo and up to 20% Garnacha, with much smaller proportions of Mazuelo and Graciano.