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Alain Jaume Domaine Grand Veneur "Le Miocene" Chateauneuf-Du-Pape Zoom

Alain Jaume Domaine Grand Veneur "Le Miocene" Chateauneuf-Du-Pape

2017 | France | Rhône 750 ml | 15.00 %
  • Tastes like
  • Berry
  • Spicy (mix)
  • Pepper (cracked)
  • Good with
  • Beef
  • Lamb
  • Its also
  • 90+
¥570
  • Buy 3 ¥513 and save 10%
  • Buy 6 ¥456 and save 20%
  • Product details

    Description:

    Domaine Grand Veneur dates back to 1826, and the Jaume family are regarded as one of the leading producers in the famous Châteauneuf-du-Pape region in the South of France. Le Miocene is made from 65% Grenache noir, 25% Syrah, 10% Mourvedre. Lush, fresh, and pure nose, full of dark fruit, earth and spices. The palate lasts for at least 40 seconds or more. There is a serious level of concentration and depth of flavour that leaves you with a juicy, peppery end note.

    Rated 93/100 by The Wine Cellar Insider, 92/100 by Robert Parker, 91/100 by Tim Atkin.

    Variety Description

    Grenache – Syrah – Mourvedre (GSM):

    Grenache – Syrah – Mourvedre blended wines – commonly known by the acronym GSM – are the particular specialty of the southern Rhone Valley in France. Grenache and Syrah are key in this part of the world, and are complemented in this instance by the addition of Mourvedre: an important but slightly less famous inclusion to the blend. GSM wines, which have been readily adopted by the New World, are rich, full bodied and leathery, and are characterized by flavors of dark fruit and spice.

    Country Description

    France:

    Practically all the most famous grape varieties used in the world's wines are French varieties, and wine is produced all throughout France. France is the second largest wine producer in the world after Italy. The wines produced range from expensive high-end wines sold internationally to more modest wines usually only seen within France. In many respects, French wines have more of a regional than a national identity, as evidenced by different grape varieties, production methods and different classification systems in the various regions. Some of the more famous wine regions in France include Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, Loire, Chablis and the Rhône valley.

    Region Description

    Rhône:

    The Rhône wine region in Southern France is situated in the Rhône river valley and produces numerous wines. The region's major appellation in production volume is Côtes du Rhône AOC. The Rhône is generally divided into two sub-regions with distinct traditions, the Northern Rhône (referred to in French as Rhône septentrional) and the Southern Rhône (in French Rhône méridional). The northern sub-region produces red wines from the Syrah grape, sometimes blended with white wine grapes, and white wines from Marsanne, Roussane and Viognier grapes. The southern sub-region produces an array of red, white and rosé wines, often blends of several grapes such as in Châteauneuf-du-Pape.